1892 Baseball Season Roster


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1892 Baseball Season Roster


  • Boston wins 102 and first postseason series over Cleveland
  • Kid Nichols (Boston), Cy Young (Cleveland), Dan Brouthers (Brooklyn) star
  • NL, now the only major league, expands to 12 teams and 140-plus games

Fans of Strat-O-Matic’s Hall of Fame rosters will recognize many of the top stars from the 1892 National League. Pitching leaders included Cy Young (36 wins), Kid Nichols (28 wins) and Amos Rusie (304 strikeouts). Batting leaders included Dan Brouthers (league-best .335 BA and .911 OPS), Billy Hamilton (.330, 132 runs) and Ed Delahanty (league-best .495 slugging). The leader boards also featured Roger Connor, Sam Thompson, Hugh Duffy, Jake Beckley and John Montgomery Ward. Wee Willie Keeler was a rookie in New York.

 

Free of the American Association and the Players League, the National League had major-league baseball to itself and expanded from eight teams to 12. But the four new teams, imported from the AA, were the league’s weakest, each finishing at least 40 games behind champion Boston. Boston won the first half of the split season, and then won the postseason series over second-half winner Cleveland.

 

 

Powered by official averages and stats with exclusive Start-O ratings;

Enhanced by 1200 additional hours of box-score analysis and in-depth research

 

Requires Strat-O-Matic Baseball 2012 or higher to play

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